Science & Society

More Stories in Science & Society

  1. portrait of a northern giant hornet specimen
    Animals

    ‘Murder hornets’ have a new common name: Northern giant hornet

    Anti-Asian hate crimes helped push U.S. entomologists to give a colorful insect initially dubbed the Asian giant hornet a less inflammatory name.

    By
  2. Red Monkeypox particles on the blue background of an infected cell are shown in this colorized transmission electron micrograph.
    Health & Medicine

    The world is ‘losing the window’ to contain monkeypox, experts warn

    As the global monkeypox outbreak surges, the world is giving the “virus room to run like it never has before,” researchers say.

    By
  3. Flood after Hurricane Sandy
    Science & Society

    In the battle of human vs. water, ‘Water Always Wins’

    In her new book, environmental journalist Erica Gies follows people who are looking for better solutions to extreme droughts and floods.

    By
  4. People wearing masks in New York City
    Science & Society

    ‘Virology’ ponders society’s relationship with viruses

    In a collection of wide-ranging essays, microbiologist Joseph Osmundson reflects on the COVID-19 pandemic and calls for “a new rhetoric of care.”

    By
  5. Anthropology

    Demond Mullins climbed Everest to inspire more Black outdoor enthusiasts

    Mullins hopes his successful Mount Everest summit will encourage more Black people to experience the great outdoors.

    By
  6. a person collecting COVID-19 swabs into a box at a concession stand with the University of Massachusetts Amherst logo
    Health & Medicine

    College COVID-19 testing can reduce coronavirus deaths in local communities

    Counties with colleges that did COVID-19 testing fared better against the coronavirus in fall 2020 than towns with colleges that did not test.

    By
  7. Two people hug outside a sign that reads ROBB ELEMENTARY SCHOOL. There are flowers all around the sign.
    Psychology

    The idea that many people grow following trauma may be a myth

    Studies of posttraumatic growth are fundamentally flawed and can contribute to toxic cultural narratives, researchers say.

    By
  8. a team working to destroy an unexploded missile. Two people stand around a small post in a dug-up portion of field, with a blue vehicle in the distance
    Science & Society

    Russia’s invasion could cause long-term harm to Ukraine’s prized soil

    War will physically and chemically damage Ukraine’s prized, highly fertile chernozem soils. The impacts on agriculture could last for years.

    By
  9. A photo of a yellow pasture with and farm in the distance. Behind the buildings heavy dark smoke clouds fill the sky
    Health & Medicine

    Western wildfires’ health risks extend across the country

    As western wildfires become more common, hazardous smoke is sending people — especially children — to emergency rooms on the East Coast.

    By